Trump requests $15.4B spending clawback

President TrumpDonald John TrumpSessions unveils ‘zero tolerance’ policy at southern border NY attorney general resigns after allegations of physical abuse Trump Jr. mocks Schneiderman after reports he abused women MORE on Tuesday officially asked Congress to rescind $15.4 billion in spending from previously approved funds, the largest single such request from a White House and the first in nearly two decades.

Congress has 45 days to approve the request in a measure that is not subject to a Senate filibuster.

The White House says that the clawback is mostly aimed at unobligated funds, such as those leftovers in accounts for defunct programs. Scrapping unobligated funds does not reduce the deficit.

Some of the funds being targeted, however, would reduce expenditures.

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“If enacted, these rescissions would decrease Federal outlays in the affected accounts by an estimated $3.0 billion,” Mick MulvaneyJohn (Mick) Michael MulvaneyMortgage firm drops major challenge to consumer bureau structure SEC launches searchable database of targeted fraudsters The Hill’s Morning Report: Frustration mounts as Republicans blow up tax message MORE, director of the White House Office of Management and Budget, wrote in a letter to the president on the request.

The White House hopes to pressure Democrats to vote for the package by saving more controversial clawbacks, such as those dealing with current spending levels, for a future request.

Democrats cried foul at the notion of cancelling recently approved 2018 spending from a bipartisan deal, saying it would breach the agreement and poison the well for future negotiations.

Democrats say that some of the clawbacks in the current proposal are not so innocuous, including some from the Children’s Health Insurance Program (CHIP).

“These Republican rescissions show the hypocrisy of a GOP Congress that insists on tight budgets for children and families while handing enormous, unpaid-for giveaways to corporations and the wealthiest,” House Minority Leader Nancy PelosiNancy Patricia D’Alesandro PelosiTrump records robocall in support of Renacci ahead of Ohio Senate primary McCarthy: Dems want to ‘capture’ Congress and impeach Trump It’s the Trump economy, stupid MORE (D-Calif.) said Monday night. 

The White House says that the CHIP funds are from two accounts: one in which the spending authorization has already lapsed, and another that has excess funds that are not expected to be used.

“None of the CHIP programs that have just been reauthorized would be impacted in any way should this rescissions package pass,” Mulvaney told reporters at the Capitol Tuesday.

Some of the other categories in the rescission request include $4.3 billion from the Advanced Technology Vehicles Manufacturing Loan Program in the Energy Department, which the White House says has not issued a loan since 2011; leftover funds designated for the Ebola outbreak that has since been quashed; and $800 million from the Center for Medicare and Medicaid Innovation, which the White House says is due to receive an automatic top-up from mandatory spending anyway.

The Republican Study Committee, the largest conservative House caucus, voiced its approval for the package and called for its passage in the Senate, where it faces skepticism from Majority Leader Mitch McConnellAddison (Mitch) Mitchell McConnellGOP nightmare looms in West Virginia Overnight Finance: Trump looks to rescind B in spending | SEC Republican commish to retire, risking deadlock | House to vote Tuesday on repealing car loan guidelines White House to request Congress rescind billion in spending MORE (R-Ky.).

“Instead of making excuses for why keeping our promises is not possible, Mitch McConnell should make every effort to pass this package,” the caucus said in a resolution adopted by its steering committee.

Melanie Zanona contributed to this report.